Learning Strategies Blog

How to Break a Habit

by Pete Bissonette

Do you have a habit that is inconsistent with what you want in your life?

* Jay loved his job, but he was late for work at least three days a week. He knew this was inconsistent with the peak performer he dreamed to be.

* Jacob was a waiter at a top restaurant. His tip earnings were always at the top. But he would mouth off at his manager. As a result of this habit, his manager threatened to move Jacob to lunchtime service instead of the lucrative dinnertime service.

* John was a trucker, and he was away from home for weeks at a time. Over the course of years he began picking up women in different parts of the country. While it weighed heavy on his emotions, his wife never found out.

All three had habits that were inconsistent with what they wanted in life, and they turned to Paul Scheele’s Break the Habit Paraliminal.

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Why Change Seems So Hard: Essay on Facilitating Buy-In and Avoiding Resistance

by Sharon Drew Morgen

(Sharon Drew leads a live virtual training for us this June called The How of Change. You can find more information below.)

How do we manage change in our organizations? Not very well, apparently. According to statistics, the success rate for many planned change implementations is low: 37 percent for Total Quality Management; 30 percent for Reengineering and Business Process Reengineering, and a whopping 97% for some software implementations. Regardless of the industry, situation, levels of people involved, or intended outcome, change seems to be sabotaged in unknown ways, causing the real possibility of failure:

  • Internal partners fail in attempts to promote and elicit proposed change initiatives across departments.
  • Leaders get blindsided by unknowns, creating more problems or becoming part of the problem when attempting to find a fix.
  • The system gets disrupted during the change process, unwittingly harming people, relationships, and initiatives.
  • Improper, or non-existent, integration between developers and users cause lack of buy-in and resistance.
  • The change doesn’t get adopted as conceived, with financial and personal fallout.
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Behavior Modification Doesn’t Modify Behaviors: An Essay on Why it Fails and What to Use Instead

by Sharon Drew Morgen

(Sharon Drew leads a live virtual training for us this June called The How of Change. You can find more information below.)

I recently chatted with a VC invested in 15 healthcare apps that use Behavior Modification to facilitate patients through permanent behavior change for enhanced health. He said although many of his apps use it, there’s no scientific evidence that Behavior Modification works. Hmmmm… And the reason you’re still using it is… “There’s nothing else to use.”

I contend that current Behavior Mod approaches are not only faulty, but seriously harmful to a large population of people who need to consider permanent change. You see, Behavior Modification does NOT instigate new behaviors or permanently change existing ones. In diet, smoking cessation, and exercise maintenance alone, there is a 97% failure rate for ongoing adoption of altered behaviors.

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Waves of Sadness

by Pete Bissonette

Events in our world can cause waves of sadness. When I feel those waves, I listen to the Gratitude Paraliminal.

It helps open your heart with both gratitude for all aspects of life and love toward yourself and others.

When you express gratitude and love, you radiate goodness, producing soothing health and well-being in your mind, body, emotions, and relationships with others. It counteracts waves of sadness.

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Are Your Food Choices Putting You at Risk?

by Pete Bissonette

A fast-food meal can set off an outsized “inflammatory response” to deal with the unhealthy aspects of the meal. This can be bad news, because it can accelerate the development of vascular diseases and type 2 diabetes.

Researchers at the University of Bonn discovered that mice placed for one month on a “Western diet”—high in unhealthy fat, high in sugar, and low in fiber—developed a strong inflammatory response throughout the body, just like when faced with a dangerous bacterial infection.

Only after four weeks of returning to a healthy diet did that acute inflammation disappear. However, many of the genes that had “turned on” during the fast food phase were still active in a state of alarm, according to the study published in the journal Cell.

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