Learning Strategies Blog

See Yourself as a Doer

by Pete Bissonette

Want to eat healthier?

Imagine you already do, suggest researchers Amanda Brouwer and Katie Mosack in a study published in the journal Self & Identity.

Envisioning the concept of “self as doer”—labeling yourself as a vegetable eater, water drinker, or sugar evader, for example—can merge the healthy behaviors you want to adopt into your identity.

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Creating Miracles

by Pete Bissonette

Miracles are made of wonder.

You feel you’ve beaten the odds, like when surviving an illness or finding your life partner. Or when landing that dream job, winning a contest, or finding the perfect home at the perfect price.

Have you ever noticed that some people have more miracles in their lives than others? It’s as if slot machines ring when they walk by.

The good news is you can turn yourself into one of those people.

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How to Be Happy

by Pete Bissonette

 

Figure out how to be happy from within.

Outer happiness tied to money, possessions, relationships, health, accomplishments… cannot be guaranteed.

Happiness generated from within can endure no matter what is happening around you.

We call that “happy for no reason.”

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Using Your Internal GPS

by Pete Bissonette

Your body and mind are great instruments of sensing. They are like an “internal GPS” or inner guidance mechanism that is tuned to your purpose.

Hold your destination in mind and you will be led to the clues the universe is always leaving for you.

Follow up with confident and courageous daily actions. Just knowing about the clues is not enough. You need to be in action.

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How Stress Affects Your Neural Circuits

by Pete Bissonette

Stress can change the neural circuits in your brain, creating a cycle of more stress.

According to a study from a research team at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and published in the journal PLOS ONE, work-related stress can have severe neurological consequences including exhaustion, detachment, and feelings of ineffectiveness.

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