Learning Strategies Blog

Wasting Time

by Pete Bissonette

When you have places to go, things to do, and people to see, it is good to be conscious about your time.

I’ve heard from too many clients who can’t get projects at work done on time… or constantly say things like “I’m too tired to do the dishes, I’ll watch TV instead.” “I never have enough time for everything I have to do.” “Something always gets in the way.” “I’d love to learn the guitar or write poetry.” “I should call Mom.”

That’s where the Conscious Time Paraliminal comes in.

It helps you realize the true value of your time so it becomes easier to manage your time in ways that reward you, energize you, and make your life worthwhile. You’ll find yourself wasting a lot less time.

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BUY IN: How to Procure Compliance, and Why It Seems Difficult

by Sharon Drew Morgen

(Sharon Drew leads a live virtual training for us this June called The How of Change. You can find more information below.)

Have you ever attempted to implement a procedure with a group, or move toward some sort of change that everyone approved of, or get a prospect, client, or patient to agree to adopt a new solution and ultimately fail due to lack of Buy In? It happens all the time:

97% of software implementations are considered failures (and it’s blamed on the group).

The sales model fails to close 95% of assumed buyers, even those who really need their services (and it’s blamed on the ‘stupid’ buyer).

Coaches lose clients who didn’t get the results they wanted (and it’s assumed the clients didn’t really want to change).

Negotiations rarely end up with both sides feeling they were treated fairly (and it’s blamed on the Other being selfish/vindictive, etc.).

Healthcare practitioners fail to convince ill patients to switch to lifesaving regimens (and it’s blamed on the patient not wanting to be healthy).

In each of the above situations, Buy In, permanent Behavior change, compliance, and better decision making could have easily been facilitated by the Influencer. But not with the approaches used.

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Tap Your Imagination for Greater Success

by Pete Bissonette

When you were eight years old, what did you imagine you would become?

A veterinarian, musician, or astronaut? Maybe all three?

Do you still engage your creative imagination to achieve your goals today? It may be a good indicator of how sharp your memory is.

According to a Harvard University study, your ability to create imaginative scenarios is directly linked to your ability to remember details from the past.

Your episodic memory, which recalls your personal accounts of the past, is also responsible for projecting yourself into the future. In order to imagine future scenarios, the researchers explain, you must be able to extract details from the past and repurpose them into your imaginary future.

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The ‘How’ of Choice: Beyond ‘Why’ and ‘What’

by Sharon Drew Morgen

(Sharon Drew leads a live virtual training for us this June called The How of Change. You can find more information below.)

When you’re conversing with a prospect, a teenager, or a team member, how do you choose the most effective words – and how do you know if there is a problem with what you’ve communicated before it’s too late? How do you determine what to say, exactly, to effect real choice and change with folks who may have different mindsets and goals than you?

We’ve been through decades of Why, then What. But without the How, the Why and What can’t initiate choice or change: Recent brain research has proven that humans actually have no conscious access to the associations that drive our beliefs, biases, or behaviors. How do we get to our own, and Other’s, unconscious to enable change? How do we go beyond our own beliefs, biases, and behaviors to enable all that’s possible in any communication? How?

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Our Listening Biases Restrict Success

by Sharon Drew Morgen

(Sharon Drew leads a live virtual training for us this June called The How of Change. You can find more information below.)

The problem with accurately hearing what others mean to convey is not that we don’t hear their words accurately. The problem is in the interpretation. During the listening process, our brains arbitrarily filter out, or reconfigure the uncomfortable, unknown, or confusing, to make what’s been said match something we’re more familiar with. And it fails to inform us of its creative editing.

As a result, we’re left understanding some fraction of what our Communication Partner(CP) meant to convey. So if I say ABC and your brain tells you I’ve said ABL, you not only have no way of knowing that you’ve not understood my intended message, but you’re thoroughly convinced you heard what I ‘said’. Obviously, this interpretation process puts relationships and communication at risk.

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